HISTORY OF ANDROID OS FROM CUPCAKE TO JELLY BEAN

androidVersions

History of Android OS From Cupcake to Jelly Bean.

  • History Of Android OS.

Android is a Linux-based operating systemdesigned primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers. Initially developed by Android, Inc., which Google backed financially and later bought in 2005,Android was unveiled in 2007 along with the founding of the Open Handset Alliance: a consortium of hardware, software, and telecommunication companies devoted to advancing open standards for mobile devices. The first Android-powered phone was sold in October 2008.

Android is open source and Google releases the code under the Apache License.This open source code and permissive licensing allows the software to be freely modified and distributed by device manufacturers, wireless carriers and enthusiast developers. Additionally, Android has a large community of developers writing applications (“apps“) that extend the functionality of devices, written primarily in a customized version of the Java programming language.In October 2012, there were approximately 700,000 apps available for Android, and the estimated number of applications downloaded from Google Play, Android’s primary app store, was 25 billion.

These factors have contributed towards making Android the world’s most widely used smartphone platform, overtaking Symbian in the fourth quarter of 2010,and the software of choice for technology companies who require a low-cost, customizable, lightweight operating system for high tech devices without developing one from scratch. As a result, despite being primarily designed for phones and tablets, it has seen additional applications on televisions, games consoles, digital cameras and other electronics. Android’s open nature has further encouraged a large community of developers and enthusiasts to use the open source code as a foundation for community-driven projects, which add new features for advanced users or bring Android to devices which were officially released running other operating systems.

Android had a worldwide smartphone market share of 75% during the third quarter of 2012,with 750 million devices activated in total and 1.5 million activations per day.The operating system’s success has made it a target for patent litigation as part of the so-called “smartphone wars” between technology companies. As of May 2013, a total of 900 million Android devices have been activated and 48 billion apps have been installed from the Google Play store.

  • History of Android OS From Cupcake to Jelly Bean.

Since the introduction of Android in 2007, Google’s flagship open-source OS for mobiles, the dynamics of the mobile phone industry have changed completely. A new mobile ecosystem, consisting of Android apps and mobile hardware has evolved at a rapid pace, challenging traditional market leaders like Apple, Nokia and Blackberry. If you ever wondered how this game-changing mobile OS has evolved over the years, then please read on. However, bear in mind that Google has an odd, albeit humorous, way of codenaming its Android OS products after mouthwatering desserts, so if you have a sweet tooth, we suggest that you find something sugary to enjoy while reading this post!

Evolution of the Android OS:

Google entered the mobile industry after acquiring Android Inc. in 2005, setting off rumors that it was planning on entering the mobile space. The rumors turned out to be true, as Google announced in November 2007 that it indeed was working on an open-source mobile OS, named Android, based on a Linux kernel. This new OS was to be used by members of the’ Open Handset Alliance’, a consortium of 65 companies involved in the mobile space who are advocates of open source standards for the mobile industry. Since then, mobile devices running on Android have gained rapid popularity among consumers, with Android OS currently dominating the smartphone market.
Each major release of the Google Android OS is named after a sugary treat, in alphabetical order. Here is a quick flashback of all the different versions, along with the associated sugary delights:

Android 1.0 and 1.1

The first version was released in September 2008, along with its launch device, ‘HTC Hero’. Both the OS and the HTC device received favorable reviews. The dream of an open-source mobile ecosystem finally became a reality!

Version 1.1 (released in February 2009) just came with a few updates and tweaks, with no major changes. At this stage, Google had not started naming its Android releases after delicacies, so these updates had no names assigned.

Android 1.5 Cupcake

Since the introduction of Android in 2007, Google’s flagship open-source OS for mobiles, the dynamics of the mobile phone industry have changed completely. A new mobile ecosystem, consisting of Android apps and mobile hardware has evolved at a rapid pace, challenging traditional market leaders like Apple, Nokia and Blackberry. If you ever wondered how this game-changing mobile OS has evolved over the years, then please read on. However, bear in mind that Google has an odd, albeit humorous, way of codenaming its Android OS products after mouthwatering desserts, so if you have a sweet tooth, we suggest that you find something sugary to enjoy while reading this post!

Evolution of the Android OS:

Google entered the mobile industry after acquiring Android Inc. in 2005, setting off rumors that it was planning on entering the mobile space. The rumors turned out to be true, as Google announced in November 2007 that it indeed was working on an open-source mobile OS, named Android, based on a Linux kernel. This new OS was to be used by members of the’ Open Handset Alliance’, a consortium of 65 companies involved in the mobile space who are advocates of open source standards for the mobile industry. Since then, mobile devices running on Android have gained rapid popularity among consumers, with Android OS currently dominating the smartphone market.
Each major release of the Google Android OS is named after a sugary treat, in alphabetical order. Here is a quick flashback of all the different versions, along with the associated sugary delights:

Android 1.0 and 1.1

The first version was released in September 2008, along with its launch device, ‘HTC Hero’. Both the OS and the HTC device received favorable reviews. The dream of an open-source mobile ecosystem finally became a reality!

Version 1.1 (released in February 2009) just came with a few updates and tweaks, with no major changes. At this stage, Google had not started naming its Android releases after delicacies, so these updates had no names assigned.

Android 1.5 Cupcake

Released in April 2009, this was the first major Android revision to get an official name by Google, heralding the start of the “dessert series” naming convention. With Cupcake, features like video uploading, text prediction and wireless music streaming became available.

Android 1.6 Donut

Released in September 2009, Donut came with major updates, the highlight of which was Google Maps. It also fixed OS reboot errors and enhanced the photo and video capabilities.

Android 2.0/2.1 Éclair

Version 2.0 was released in December 2009, followed by 2.1 in January 2010. These are considered to be a single release by most people, allowing added capabilities for Bluetooth, multi-touch support and live wallpapers, among other features.

Android 2.2 Froyo

Short for “Frozen Yoghurt”, this version was released in May 2010. It allowed for improved OS speed, supported hi-definition screen resolutions and Adobe Flash 10.1, enabling users to stream videos via their mobile browsers. Added support for Wi-Fi hotspot connectivity also became available.

Android 2.3 Gingerbread

This version made its debut in December 2010. The key feature that became available with this release was the much hyped ‘Near Field Communications’ (NFC) capability, allowing users to perform tasks such as mobile payments and data exchange through swiping their mobile phones over a tag. It also added support for more than one camera and other sensors.

Android 3.0/3.1/3.2 Honeycomb

Released first in February 2011 and followed rapidly by the 3.1 and 3.2 revisions during the same year, this incremental release added several new features. This version was optimized for tablets and provided developers with more control over UI. It also allowed users the capability to load media files directly from an SD card.

Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich

Released in October 2011, this was a major overhaul to the Android UI, allowing enhanced contact menus, improved keyboard layouts and NFC capabilities. Since Honeycomb was optimized just for tablets, with most phones still running the 2.x Android versions, the Ice Cream Sandwich release strove for a unified platform that was optimized to run on both tablets and phones.

Android 4.1.x Jelly Bean

The latest major Android update was released in July, 2012. Jelly Bean further polished the Android UI, and also refined the software, enabling Android devices to run faster and also making them even more user-friendly than before. The 4.x updates have allowed developers to create quality apps over Android, cementing its place as the operating system of choice among users.

We eagerly await the next release of Android along with its official moniker (rumored to be “Key Lime Pie”). Off to have our sugar fix!

Released in April 2009, this was the first major Android revision to get an official name by Google, heralding the start of the “dessert series” naming convention. With Cupcake, features like video uploading, text prediction and wireless music streaming became available.

Android 1.6 Donut

Released in September 2009, Donut came with major updates, the highlight of which was Google Maps. It also fixed OS reboot errors and enhanced the photo and video capabilities.

Android 2.0/2.1 Éclair

Version 2.0 was released in December 2009, followed by 2.1 in January 2010. These are considered to be a single release by most people, allowing added capabilities for Bluetooth, multi-touch support and live wallpapers, among other features.

Android 2.2 Froyo

Short for “Frozen Yoghurt”, this version was released in May 2010. It allowed for improved OS speed, supported hi-definition screen resolutions and Adobe Flash 10.1, enabling users to stream videos via their mobile browsers. Added support for Wi-Fi hotspot connectivity also became available.

Android 2.3 Gingerbread

This version made its debut in December 2010. The key feature that became available with this release was the much hyped ‘Near Field Communications’ (NFC) capability, allowing users to perform tasks such as mobile payments and data exchange through swiping their mobile phones over a tag. It also added support for more than one camera and other sensors.

Android 3.0/3.1/3.2 Honeycomb

Released first in February 2011 and followed rapidly by the 3.1 and 3.2 revisions during the same year, this incremental release added several new features. This version was optimized for tablets and provided developers with more control over UI. It also allowed users the capability to load media files directly from an SD card.

Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich

Released in October 2011, this was a major overhaul to the Android UI, allowing enhanced contact menus, improved keyboard layouts and NFC capabilities. Since Honeycomb was optimized just for tablets, with most phones still running the 2.x Android versions, the Ice Cream Sandwich release strove for a unified platform that was optimized to run on both tablets and phones.

Android 4.1.x Jelly Bean

The latest major Android update was released in July, 2012. Jelly Bean further polished the Android UI, and also refined the software, enabling Android devices to run faster and also making them even more user-friendly than before. The 4.x updates have allowed developers to create quality apps over Android, cementing its place as the operating system of choice among users.

We eagerly await the next release of Android along with its official moniker (rumored to be “Key Lime Pie”). Off to have our sugar fix!

Courtesy..http://www.veriqual.com & wikipedia.

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